Humans of EUROCLIO: Sue Bennett

Sue Bennett Former EUROCLIO President Q: How did you first get involved with EUROCLIO? In 1991, I received an invitation from the Council of Europe to attend a conference on history education in Bruges, Belgium. At that time, I was employed as an Adviser for History at the National Curriculum […]

The Interwar Period Through Various Perspectives

From 18-19 November 2017, EUROCLIO ambassador Ineke Veldhuis-Meester attended the international congress “Fundamental rights in democratic and totalitarian European countries during the interwar period 1918-1939” in Tallinn, Estonia. At the congress Ineke’s role was two-fold: she gave both a lecture on the experiences of the Dutch during the interwar period, and collected many different impressions and interpretations from various international participants to create a well-rounded report from many different perspectives.

How was it possible that democratic countries became dictatorships during the interwar period in Europe? What happened and how is it perceived today?  These are the questions the congress “Fundamental rights in democratic and totalitarian European countries during the interwar period 1918-1939” in Tallinn, Estonia, sought to answer. The congress aimed to facilitate an exchange of information on how the interwar period is taught in different countries.

Teaching the Ends of Empires

In early November, the Bronbeek Museum hosted a day-long conference, sponsored by the National 4/5 May Committee of the Netherlands on how to teach decolonisation in former empires. Ethan Mark, a modern Asia historian from Leiden University, was there and shared the following insights with EUROCLIO highlighting the themes and outcomes […]

Push for Copyright Reform in Education

Early next year, the Legal Affairs (JURI) Committee of the European Commission will vote on a new directive concerning the use of copyrighted materials for educational purposes across the EU.  The directive, in theory, aims to expand upon existing exemptions from copyright legislation in education at an EU level. While […]

New Narrative for Europe

By Stefan Haagendoorn On the 12th and 13th of October, I was in Leuven, Belgium to partake in a youth event organized by the European Commission, which was focused on the question on how to form a New Narrative for Europe. As a historian, many questions immediately come to mind. […]

Fascism and Anti-fascism in our time: Critical Investigations

In light of the recent surge in nationalist and authoritarian movements in Europe and around the world, “Mapping Memories“, an event programme of the German Federal Agency for Civic Education, organised a conference in Hamburg & Lűbenurg from 1-3 November 2017 discussing the potential for histories of fascism and anti-fascism to provide […]

How to Deal with Colombia’s Violent Past? Part II

This is the second part of a report made by Meena Pankaj Malhotra and Senada Jusic on their study visit to Colombia. It is the eleventh article in a series of blogposts and reports on all study visits made for the project “Dealing with the Past in History Education”. In this project civil society actors from different backgrounds, visit schools and institutions in countries that are struggling with a difficult past. For the first part of this report, please click here.

Pedagogy in the MNM

During our visit to Colombia, we learned that there are a number of ways and methodologies that are being used across the country to deal with the violent past. The theme across all methodology is to keep memory alive so that it never happens again. Here museums have a very important role to play to not only institutionalize memory but also to put structures in place that transform individual memories into collective memory.

One of the most important projects of the Centro Nacional de Memoria Historia is the plan to set up a museum.  Land has already been acquired for this purpose and a call for the museums architectural design has been sent out. Catalina Orozco, through her presentation, explained in detail the plans and the pedagogical approach that the museum will use to educate citizens about Colombia’s violent past.

How to Deal with Colombia’s Violent Past?

This is the first part of a report made by Meena Pankaj Malhotra and Senada Jusic on their study visit to Colombia. It is the tenth article in a series of blogposts and reports on all study visits made for the project “Dealing with the Past in History Education”. In this project civil society actors from different backgrounds, visit schools and institutions in countries that are struggling with a difficult past.
For over five decades Colombia has experienced intense violence associated with multiple unresolved social and political conflict—a violence that has been changing its characteristics over the decades with regards to its agents, motivations, intensity and mechanisms. Hundreds of thousands of fatalities have occurred by massacres and assassinations. Over and above that, innumerable Colombians have become victims of forced disappearance, forced displacement, abduction, extrajudicial executions, unlawful recruitment, torture, abuse, and sexual violence. Resistance to suffering is inherent in human nature. Today in Colombia one sees a strong sense of this resistance—in political will, in civil society, in individuals. Our study visit intends to highlight some of these efforts by individuals, civil society, education institutions and the state.

The Truth about Finland

Over the last two years, at various conferences and meetings, people have been pointing at Finland as the country which will “abolish” all school subjects. Posts about this have in fact gone viral a number of times. This lead us to talk with our Board Member from Finland, Riita Mikkola, […]