New Source Collections: Napoleon and European Royalty

Portrait of Ahmed III (1673-1736), 23rd Sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1703-1730). (Jean-Baptiste Vanmour, 1700-1737, Rijksmuseum via Europeana)

Historiana now has two new Europeana source collections available. The first is about the life and influence of Napoleon, and the second source collection shows the impressive power of some European monarchs.

Different views on Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, has been subject to many contrasting historical interpretations ever since his spectacular rise from modest stature as a Corsican artillery officer to the Emperor of France, temporarily controlling large parts of Continental Europe. This source collection aims to improve students’ ability to evaluate historical interpretations, by offering contrasting artistic evidence to some of the main interpretations of Napoleon.

Expressions of power and status by European royalty

European monarchs rely on a variety of symbols to assert their legitimacy, both on national and international levels. This source collection aims to improve students’ ability to express themselves historically, by offering contrasting artistic evidence to some of the portrayals of power and status by European royals.

Historiana e-learning environment and the Europeana Collections

The source collections make use of the Europeana Collections, consisting of over 50 million digitised primary sources. The sources are carefully curated to create collections of sources that are useful to achieve specific learning outcomes. For instance, one collection presents sources that are very helpful to give students a sense of time. Another source collection focuses on cause and consequence, by offering visual material on many aspects of the human impact of World War One.

Exemplar learning activities

Together with the sets of sources selected from the Europeana Collections, EUROCLIO will publish e-learning activities that show how educators can make use of the sources, with a specific focus on students’ acquisition of historical thinking skills. All the learning activities are freely available, easily copied, and adjusted to your specific needs. Stay tuned for more interactive content in the coming weeks!

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