EUROCLIO Online Training – How to use Historiana with Europeana classroom

Warehouses (or Factories) in Canton, Guangdong (present-day Guangzhou, some 120km northwest of Hong Kong), run by European states trading with China. (A View of the European Factories at Canton, William Daniell, around 1800, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

The  sources available in the Europeana Collections are vast and very useful, but it is important to know how to navigate this platform in order to make the most out of its potential. This is why EUROCLIO, in collaboration with Europeana, is hosting trainings to bring these skills to teachers throughout Europe. On May 14, EUROCLIO’s trainers hosted one such seminar using eTwinning, to cater to the needs of those unable to attend in-person events.

The participants were introduced to the Historiana e-Activity Builder, which allows users to develop enquiry questions, to set up a sequence of learning using digital tools designed by other history teachers, and to get students to respond to questions in an assessable way. These eLearning Activities can be created in any language, and the Historiana eLearning Environment is and will remain free to use for teachers and students. 72% of respondents rated this online seminar as “excellent,” and another 28% as “very good.”

Six Historiana collections are complete and available online for your browsing pleasure, and ready to be used in your own learning activities! They include: Expressions of power and status by European royalty, European emigration to the United States in the late 19th century, Changes over Time: Water, Bridges, and Transport, Women in the First World War, Different views on Napoleon Bonaparte, and The human impact of World War One.

One of our favourites is Changes over Time: Water, Bridges, and Transport, and pictured above is an image of that collection dating from late 18th century China. This image, like the others part of this fascinating collection, gives us an idea of what it was like to be engaged in travel and trade hundreds of years ago, and is an invaluable resource for teachers looking to make history come to life for their students. We hope you will check it out for yourself!

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